Sitero Review

Some time ago I lost track of my race numbers.   I fail miserably at tracking my training and I'll ride just about any bike, in just about any type of clothing.  My friends and athletes have seen me out in my flip flops on a tri bike or wearing a sweat shirt on one of our group rides.  I roll with the punches most of the time.  We kind of have to, don't we?  That being said, there has been one constant in my racing and cycling career.  For 15+ years I have never sat squarely on my saddle and I can say with confidence that is not comfortable.  But as athletes we learn to embrace pain and suffering. That all changed when I discovered a new seat called Sitero by Specialized…

The pelvis is made up of several bones that, in conjunction with the lower back, work together to support the body’s weight, anchor abdominal and hip muscles, and protect delicate vital reproductive organs.  If the bones of the pelvis are not supported properly, the soft tissue of …well…”down there” takes the brunt of your torsos weight.  This ultimately results in numbness, tingling, inflammation, and possibly serious health concerns.

Historically, popular road performance bike saddles have been designed to be as skinny as possible, forcing the body to be supported on soft tissue.  However, there have been significant advances in saddle construction that allow for a more anatomically healthy position.  Specialized has recently released one of the highest blood flow rated seats on the market.  The Sitero (pronounced Sit Aero) tests at 98% percent blood flow (I’ll leave the testing methods to your imagination). The Pro model weighs in at 211 grams and is approximately 145mm at its widest point.  This is Specialized’ first split nose saddle designed for triathletes and is their answer to the ISM Adamo, etc.  It is reasonably priced at $175 for the Expert and $225 for the Pro.

The Sitero is not designed to be sat on at the tip or the nose, but rather in the perforated ‘sit zone’.  This is the area that is designed specifically to relieve pressure.  What is the difference between the Sitero and its competitors?  The Sitero focuses on the athlete sitting on the Pubic Rami (pelvis) rather than on the ischial tuberosities (sit bones).  Therefore, when in an aero position more blood flow is achievable.

sitero

The Cons are limited.  There is a small limitation with the fore and aft of the saddle since the rails are not long as some of the other aero saddles out there.  Therefore, although uncommon, it might not fit all athletes.  The saddle can be a little hard if you are used to a very cushioned seat.  However, it does soften up over a few rides.

rails

The long story short is the Sitero has changed the way that I feel about riding.  I felt like I got too much flex from completely separated nose pieces such as the Adamo or Koobi and not enough support from other split seats.  The Sitero allows me to sit comfortably on my bike and gives me more than adequate blood flow.   I liked to ride my bike before but never looked forward to the after effects.  But now, I love to ride my bike and can’t wait for the next ride!

Where can you get your self on one of these seats?  Well right here at "probably the best bike shop in the world".